Notes from Beacon Council

By Jeff Simms

The summer months are often slow for local government, but Beacon addressed various ongoing projects at its most recent council session.

On July 2, the Beacon City Council accepted a report by Francis Griggs, a consulting engineer who specializes in the restoration of historic bridges, on the condition and options for rehabilitating the Bridge Street Bridge, a 19th century structure near Front Street.

The council then approved an agreement authorizing Griggs to prepare a similar report on the Tioronda Avenue Bridge, which has also been pegged by the city for restoration.

The council also set public hearings for July 16 on several projects seeking special-use permits. The projects are the proposed expansion of the professional building at 1181 North Ave., the proposed expansion of the Hudson Hills Academy school onto the grounds of St. Luke’s Church at 850 Wolcott Ave., and the Edgewater development near the Beacon waterfront.

In addition, the council accepted a $14,500 proposal from One Nature and Hudson Land Design for restoration work at Green Street Park. The project would create additional parking and a formal entrance to the park, as well as adding trees, repairing fences and introducing other design elements. A timeline for the work has yet to be determined.

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